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Saturday, January 10, 2015

George Zimmerman Charged With Assault (Newser Happy Hour 6-pack)

Newser Alert
The day's six most popular stories, in time to unwind.


George Zimmerman Charged With Assault

George Zimmerman Charged With Assault

(Newser) - George Zimmerman is starting off 2015 in a familiar place: behind bars. Police in Lake Mary, Fla., arrested the 31-year-old about 10 last night when answering a call about a domestic dispute, reports News13 in Orlando and CNN . It's not entirely clear what happened, but Zimmerman is charged with... More  »

 
Man Hiding in Building Sent Texts to Help Paris Cops

Man Hiding in Building Sent Texts to Help Paris Cops

(Newser) - Some intriguing details about the role of cell phones in yesterday's dual raids in France that killed three suspected terrorists: Hidden helper: When Cherif and Said Kouachi holed up in a building outside Paris, they were unaware that a man identified as Lilian Lepere, 26, was hiding inside. He... More  »

 
Guys Who Post Too Many Selfies Might Be Bad News: Study

Guys Who Post Too Many Selfies Might Be Bad News: Study

(Newser) - The results of a selfie study may not come as a surprise to you: Guys who post loads of them, researchers at Ohio State University find, also show signs of narcissism and even score higher on tests for psychopathy. The findings were based on an online survey of 800 men... More  »

 
Wife Shoots Husband Surprising Her With Breakfast

Wife Shoots Husband Surprising Her With Breakfast

(Newser) - A North Carolina man tried to surprise his wife with breakfast in bed, but he wound up surprising her so much that she shot him, reports WTVR . Police say that Zia Segule, 28, left their Fayetteville home about 10am yesterday, picked up some breakfast, and then returned. In doing so,... More  »

 
5 Most Incredible Discoveries of the Week

5 Most Incredible Discoveries of the Week

(Newser) - A potential breakthrough in antibiotics and an ancient metal make the list: Shipwreck Yields 'Atlantis' Metal : Orichalcum was considered one of the most precious metals in ancient times—Plato claimed it lined the temple of Poseidon on Atlantis—and now, for apparently the first time, modern-day researchers have recovered... More  »

 
French Police Hunt Widow of Slain Terror Suspect

French Police Hunt Widow of Slain Terror Suspect

(Newser) - As police in France track down accomplices of the Kouachi brothers, a 26-year-old woman named Hayat Boumeddiene is near the top of the list. She is the widow of Amedy Coulibaly, the hostage-taker at a kosher market in Paris who was killed in a police raid yesterday. The two were... More  »

 

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Daily Alert: Real Estate

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January 10, 2015
19 Castle Homes You Can Actually Buy 19 Castle Homes You Can Actually Buy
by Asta Thrastardottir on Jan 10, 2015, 2:34 PM
Ever wanted to live like royalty?  Well...


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Daily Alert: Psychology

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January 10, 2015
Here's Why Marriage Is Harder Than Ever Here's Why Marriage Is Harder Than Ever
by Jessica Orwig on Jan 9, 2015, 12:31 PM
Marriage has always been a gamble, but the...


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Shut It Down

These are the most awkward TV moments of all time. It doesn’t get any worse.

The 22 Most Painfully Awkward Things That Have Ever Happened On TV

“Wait, am I on TV? Really? RIGHT NOW? Uhhhhhh, well……”

yikes

WIN

Sam Smith’s boyfriend caught him singing BeyoncĂ© in the shower. It’s simply flawless.

OMG

Every country song is exactly the same. Here's your proof.

LOL

Want to know the secret to taking a good picture? Just whisper the word "prune" to yourself. It's what Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen do.

WIN

This woman made her husband cry by telling him she was pregnant in a photo booth. The result was adorable.

FAIL

Remember that Justin Bieber Calvin Klein ad? Surprise surprise — it was Photoshopped.

WIN

Want to kick ass at work this year? These tips from great bosses will get you inspired.

LOL

You've been drunk before. But there’s another level you can go to: Really f*cking drunk.

OMG

And finally: Take a look at these insane photos from space. And give yourself a second to think.

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Museum: We've Found Possible Site of Jesus' Trial (Newser Daily Digest)

Newser Alert


Museum: We've Found Possible Site of Jesus' Trial

Museum: We've Found Possible Site of Jesus' Trial

(Newser) - Curious to see the possible site of Jesus' trial? The Tower of David Museum in Jerusalem has begun offering tours to the suspected remains of Herod's palace, where some say Jesus was tried and sentenced to death, the Washington Post reports. "There is, of course, no inscription stating... More  »
Newser located this story for you on Saturday, January 10, 2015 7:03 AM. The story matched your section(s) Science.

 
SpaceX Rocket Recovery Test: 'Close but No Cigar'

SpaceX Rocket Recovery Test: 'Close but No Cigar'

(Newser) - SpaceX this morning successfully launched a new batch of equipment now en route to the International Space Station, but a first-of-its-kind attempt to salvage the rocket that sent it up didn't work. The idea was to try to guide the first-stage rocket back to Earth upon separation and have... More  »
Newser located this story for you on Saturday, January 10, 2015 7:03 AM. The story matched your section(s) Science.

 
5 Most Incredible Discoveries of the Week

5 Most Incredible Discoveries of the Week

(Newser) - A potential breakthrough in antibiotics and an ancient metal make the list: Shipwreck Yields 'Atlantis' Metal : Orichalcum was considered one of the most precious metals in ancient times—Plato claimed it lined the temple of Poseidon on Atlantis—and now, for apparently the first time, modern-day researchers have recovered... More  »
Newser located this story for you on Saturday, January 10, 2015 7:03 AM. The story matched your section(s) Technology, Science.

 
For a Happy Marriage, Wed Your Best Friend

For a Happy Marriage, Wed Your Best Friend

(Newser) - Marital bliss is easy to find, according to a new study : just marry your best friend. Two economists pored over surveys about well-being and found that in most places, married people are happier—even when controlling for their happiness-level before marriage, the New York Times reports. (Where it's not... More  »
Newser located this story for you on Saturday, January 10, 2015 7:03 AM. The story matched your section(s) Lifestyle.

 
What Really Happened to People of Easter Island

What Really Happened to People of Easter Island

(Newser) - A new study is wading into the hot debate over exactly why Easter Island's indigenous people declined—and already news sources are interpreting it differently. The international team of researchers come to one clear conclusion: Environmental conditions made life hard for the Rapa Nui people before Europeans ever arrived... More  »
Newser located this story for you on Saturday, January 10, 2015 7:03 AM. The story matched your section(s) Science.

 
Heart Arrhythmia May Have Influenced Beethoven Music

Heart Arrhythmia May Have Influenced Beethoven Music

(Newser) - As Beethoven went deaf, researchers say in a new study, he may have started listening to his heart. In a study published in Perspectives in Biology and Medicine , a cardiologist, an internal medical specialist, and a musicologist point out that three of the German composer's works exhibit "rhythmic... More  »
Newser located this story for you on Saturday, January 10, 2015 7:03 AM. The story matched your section(s) Science.

 
Professional 'Cuddlers' Make Up to $80 an Hour

Professional 'Cuddlers' Make Up to $80 an Hour

(Newser) - Imagine a career that let you stay in your PJs, work from home, and make around $400 a night spooning strangers? If that last part of the job description didn't scare you off, you may have what it takes to be what the Wall Street Journal calls a worker... More  »
Newser located this story for you on Saturday, January 10, 2015 7:03 AM. The story matched your section(s) Money, Lifestyle.

 
Even Beggars Don't Want Zimbabwe's New Coins

Even Beggars Don't Want Zimbabwe's New Coins

(Newser) - American bills have been used in Zimbabwe since the country adopted the US dollar in 2009. American coins? Not so much. Coins are more difficult to get into circulation, so locals had been using lollipops, gum, and pens as change, Reuters reports. Last month, however, Zimbabwe introduced its own "... More  »
Newser located this story for you on Saturday, January 10, 2015 7:03 AM. The story matched your section(s) Money.

 
Why Autism Rates Have Soared

Why Autism Rates Have Soared

(Newser) - The rate at which autism is diagnosed around the world has increased dramatically in just a generation, and researchers studying a comprehensive tracking system in Denmark say they can explain the majority of the uptick: new and improved diagnosis. In the medical journal JAMA Pediatrics, they argue that the huge... More  »
Newser located this story for you on Saturday, January 10, 2015 7:03 AM. The story matched your section(s) Science.

 

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ScienceDaily: Workplace Health News

ScienceDaily: Workplace Health News


Mental health workers don't recognize their own burnout

Posted: 09 Jan 2015 01:55 AM PST

Some mental health workers find it difficult to recognize their own burnout and even when they do they struggle to admit it to others, research shows.

ScienceDaily: Top News

ScienceDaily: Top News


Optimistic people have healthier hearts, study finds

Posted: 09 Jan 2015 09:35 AM PST

Using the American Heart Association's criteria, a study of 5,000 adults found that the most optimistic people had twice the odds of being in ideal cardiovascular health as their pessimistic counterparts.

Toward quantum chips: Packing single-photon detectors on an optical chip is crucial for quantum-computational circuits

Posted: 09 Jan 2015 07:10 AM PST

A team of researchers has built an array of light detectors sensitive enough to register the arrival of individual light particles, or photons, and mounted them on a silicon optical chip. Such arrays are crucial components of devices that use photons to perform quantum computations.

Recreational fishing in the Mediterranean is more harmful than previously thought

Posted: 09 Jan 2015 07:10 AM PST

A total of 10 percent of adults living in developed countries practice recreational fishing, which in the Mediterranean Sea represents around 10 percent of the total production of fisheries. Despite its importance, this fishing is not as controlled or studied as professional fishing. For the first time, a study examines this activity, whose effects are increasingly more similar to traditional fishing. For this reason, scientists demand greater control.

Salt tolerance gene in soybean found

Posted: 09 Jan 2015 07:09 AM PST

A collaborative research project has shown how soybeans can be bred to better tolerate soil salinity. The researchers have identified a specific gene in soybean that has great potential for soybean crop improvement.

Breakthrough: Statin treatment reduces risk of cardiovascular disease in women

Posted: 09 Jan 2015 06:37 AM PST

A large international study has shown conclusively that statin treatment reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease in women. The research confirms that statins are beneficial not only to women who have already had a cardiovascular event such as a heart attack or stroke, but also in those who - whilst they have not yet developed cardiovascular disease -- are at an increased risk of such diseases.

Devil is in the detail: Evolution of color in plants and animals

Posted: 09 Jan 2015 06:37 AM PST

Researchers have looked at a species of fish to help unravel one of the biggest mysteries in evolutionary biology. "The importance of this work lies in the fundamental question: how and why do variants of the same animal exist in nature," researchers explain.

Ritual circumcision linked to increased risk of autism in young boys, research suggests

Posted: 09 Jan 2015 06:37 AM PST

Circumcised boys are more likely than intact boys to develop autism spectrum disorder before the age of 10, new research suggests. Painful experiences in neonates have been shown in animal and human studies to be associated with long-term alterations in pain perception, a characteristic often encountered among children with ASD.

Cancer biopsies do not promote cancer spread, research finds

Posted: 09 Jan 2015 06:37 AM PST

A study of more than 2,000 patients has dispelled the myth that cancer biopsies cause cancer to spread. The researchers show that patients who received a biopsy had a better outcome and longer survival than patients who did not have a biopsy.

Skin cancer: New mechanism involved in tumor initiation, growth and progression

Posted: 09 Jan 2015 06:35 AM PST

The mechanisms regulating the different functions of Twist1 controlling skin tumor initiation, cancer stem cell function and tumor progression have been identified by researchers.

Map of mysterious molecules in our galaxy sheds new light on century-old puzzle

Posted: 09 Jan 2015 06:35 AM PST

Astronomers have created a unique map of enigmatic molecules in our galaxy that are responsible for puzzling features in the light from stars.

Bacteria could contribute to development of wound-induced skin cancer

Posted: 09 Jan 2015 05:47 AM PST

A new mechanism by which skin damage triggers the formation of tumors has been discovered by researchers, which could have important therapeutic implications for patients suffering with chronic ulcers or skin blistering diseases.

What can your online avatar say about your personality?

Posted: 09 Jan 2015 05:47 AM PST

Researchers are looking to understand the potential impressions and their limitations of those we meet in a digital context. In a new study, the researchers specifically looked at what personality traits are conveyed by a user's avatar.

Chitosan: Sustainable alternative for food packaging

Posted: 09 Jan 2015 05:46 AM PST

A material known as chitosan, made from crustacean shells, has been used to substitute petroleum by-products in food packaging. The environment is seriously affected by the use of food packaing: plastic bottles and films are present everywhere in our civilization and take between 100 and 400 years to degrade. So the quest for alternative materials to plastics produced from petroleum is an environmental priority.

Tumor-blocking role found for cell regulation molecule

Posted: 09 Jan 2015 05:46 AM PST

The role of a protein in regulating tumor development has been studied by researchers who have found that it suppresses liver cancer growth in the lab. The investigation has focused on the role of a protein controlled by JNK and p38, known as ATF2, in tumor development.

Novel breast cancer gene found: BCL11A is active in difficult-to-treat triple-negative breast cancer

Posted: 09 Jan 2015 05:46 AM PST

A gene has been identified that is especially active in aggressive subtypes of breast cancer. The research suggests that an overactive BCL11A gene drives triple-negative breast cancer development and progression.

Study supports link between injectable hormonal contraceptive and HIV risk

Posted: 09 Jan 2015 01:56 AM PST

Women using depot medroxyprogesterone acetate, commonly known as Depo-Provera or the birth control shot, have a moderately increased risk of becoming infected with HIV, a large meta-analysis of 12 studies involving more than 39,500 women has found. Other forms of hormonal contraception, including oral contraceptive pills, do not appear to increase this risk.

Mental health workers don't recognize their own burnout

Posted: 09 Jan 2015 01:55 AM PST

Some mental health workers find it difficult to recognize their own burnout and even when they do they struggle to admit it to others, research shows.

Workers' feedback vital to reduce time wasted in meetings

Posted: 09 Jan 2015 01:55 AM PST

Meetings in some organizations would be more cost effective and focused, taking less time, if employees had the opportunity to give feedback on how they are run and were involved in making improvements.

Flexible methane production from electricity and bio-mass

Posted: 09 Jan 2015 01:55 AM PST

Interlinkage of the power and gas grids is planned to make electricity supply sustainable and robust in the future. Fluctuating amounts of wind and solar power, for instance, might be stored in the form of the chemical energy carrier methane. Now researchers have now proved that this is technically feasible.

Making synthetic materials more impervious: fewer plastic substances in food

Posted: 09 Jan 2015 01:55 AM PST

Synthetic materials are convenient in many respects, but they have one disadvantage: they are permeable to gases. In order to make plastic more impervious, engineers apply wafer-thin layers on surfaces. This would not only increase the shelf life of food in plastic packaging, but would also prevent the migration of substances from the plastic into the food.

More sun means fewer children, grandchildren, Norwegian study finds

Posted: 09 Jan 2015 01:55 AM PST

A new study shows that increased UV radiation can have an effect on human fertility over generations. On average, the lifespan of children born in years that had a great deal of solar activity was 5.2 years shorter than other children. Children who were born in years with lots of sunshine and who survived were also more likely to have fewer children, who in turn gave birth to fewer children than others. This finding shows that increased UV radiation during years of high solar activity had an effect across generations.

From the lab to your digital device, quantum dots have made quantum leaps

Posted: 09 Jan 2015 01:51 AM PST

Quantum dots have not only found their way into tablets, computer screens, and TVs, they are also used in biological and medical imaging tools, and now researchers are exploring them for solar cell as well as brain imaging applications.

Study of Andromeda's stellar disk indicates more violent history than Milky Way

Posted: 08 Jan 2015 03:43 PM PST

A detailed study of the motions of different stellar populations in the disk of the Andromeda galaxy has found striking differences from our own Milky Way, suggesting a more violent history of mergers with smaller galaxies in Andromeda's recent past.

Flashes from 'photonic booms' may help illuminate astronomical secrets

Posted: 08 Jan 2015 03:42 PM PST

'Photonic booms' may turn out to help illuminate a variety of astronomical objects such as asteroids and the moon.

On a tropical island, fossils reveal past -- and possible future -- of polar ice

Posted: 08 Jan 2015 01:24 PM PST

The balmy islands of Seychelles couldn't feel farther from Antarctica, but their fossil corals could reveal much about the fate of polar ice sheets. About 125,000 years ago, the average global temperature was only slightly warmer, but sea levels rose high enough to submerge the locations of many of today's coastal cities. Understanding what caused seas to rise then could shed light on how to protect those cities today.

Malassezia yeasts, everywhere and sometimes dangerous

Posted: 08 Jan 2015 11:47 AM PST

Malassezia yeasts have been found in human dandruff, deep-sea vents, and pretty much everywhere in between. The skin of most if not all warm-blooded animals is covered with these microbes, and while they mostly live in peaceful co-existence with their hosts, they can cause serious diseases in humans and other animals.

Scientists explain spread of chikungunya vector

Posted: 08 Jan 2015 11:47 AM PST

The tropical disease chikungunya began twisting Western tongues in July when the first locally transmitted case was reported in Florida. Spotted in the Caribbean just last year, the disease spread explosively throughout the Americas in 2014. Chikungunya's arrival in Panama prompted Smithsonian scientists to examine how human activity spreads its mosquito vector and the serious implications this has for disease ecology everywhere.

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